Wednesday, February 3, 2016


Knowing that there was much sorrow in the world during the Depression, The Farmer's Wife magazine tried their best to print encouraging letters.

From Nebraska--
     We have worked hard the last seven years, worked early and late, and what have we to show for it? Nothing. Perhaps Mrs. M.A.M. (a previous writer) has not had the sickness and expense we have had.
     My husband worked at home till he was 21 to get the few essentials for farming, but had to sell everything and prepare for the army. With practically nothing at all, we married. Husband works by the day when he can get work. He had about $25 to begin with. How far would that go toward buying a farm or stocking it?
      By the time we saved a little money along came a baby and took it all. Five babies in six years, with one going on to the land beyond. Now don't think the babies were unwelcome. Far from it. There are things in this world of more value than mere possession of land.
     You don't know what it is to climb from the depths of poverty, you have never tried it. Does poverty hurt one? No, not as long as he puts his trust in God. It is a refining plant to bring out the gold that there is in us.
From Iowa--
     Dear Me! Everybody's talking hard times! Sometimes we feel sort of downhearted and discouraged about it. But I know one little boy who says, "Hard times are sort of cozy times." That's because the whole family works and plans together. It's like pioneer days when people had to build a new life in a new country. Most of us here wished we had lived in pioneer times. They seemed so thrilling and "cozy." Well now we've a chance to be pioneers.


Sandra Henderson said...

Your posts are so sweet and often timely for me. Thank you for your work. I look forward to reading each time. I didn't know you were doing a coloring book! I've not gotten onto that wagon but I will now! I'm off to order one! 😎

matty said...

I like this as it is so true even today! I enjoyed the one above, as well, but there wasn't a way to comment on it... I live in one of those "old homes" and love it dearly; however, it does own one... :) There is always a cold spot or a sagging corner or rotten boards... but I think of the previous owners, (it wasn't out of their family from 1917 until 1993 when I bought it) and trudge on... repairing one bit at a time...