Sunday, June 15, 2014

AMUSING CHILDREN; February 1907; by Mrs. E. C. Rocheford

Rain, rain, and the children must be amused, and they must be kept quiet for there is sickness in the house, and the little ones are cross and peevish, and will slip away and get wet, and then the work of changing clothes and the trouble of drying them, and the crossness and scolding and temper matching the weather.


A bucketful of sand will amuse children for hours at a time. Newspapers, scissors and a pot of paste always delight children. They may string beads, the more colors the better; brushes and paints are a child's delight. Colored papers may be woven in mats or made in chains by pasting the links together and for pity's sake give the children plenty of room. They must have their rights, and they must have a happy childhood memory to follow them through life. Play with them, be real company for them. Teach them to work, to sew, to iron, to sweep, to fill wood boxes, to help wherever there is a chance for them to be of use. It is surprising how much children can do to lighten the mother's burden.

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

A FRUGAL HOUSE MOTHER; March 1912; Mrs. E. W., Kansas

Being a farmer's wife, we of course have no stated income, and can never tell what the amount of money will be that can be used in the home. But I always try to manage so the expense shall not exceed the income. Of course, we keep cows, and have our own milk and butter with some butter to spare to help out the grocery bill. We have a garden, but we do not always raise enough potatoes for our own use, and therefore we must buy. We try to sell enough of some other garden truck, that we have a surplus of, to pay for the potatoes. We keep chickens so that we have eggs and young chickens to use and sell. We have our meat and lard.

I have always tried to get what was needed about the house from the sale of poultry and eggs, or from garden truck. I have bought everything I have in my house with the money I made from the poultry, from a set of kitchen chairs to a $50.00 range and organ and my home is well furnished. Of course, I did not do all this in one year. We have a large family of children to clothe and send to school. I have kept them in school and last winter I put two of the eldest girls through a nine months' term in a city school, paying all their expenses from the proceeds of eggs alone.

I am obliged very often to exercise my wits in order to make a good appearance in matching up outgrown clothing for the little ones from the garments of the older ones; also in preparing food there is a great saving to be made, so that grocery bills shall not be charged at the store.

The farmer's income is very often much less than $40.00 per month and the saving and also earning pennies nearly always come from the good management of the house mother.


Thursday, June 5, 2014

FARM MEMORIES; 1907; American Magazine

One morning I was awakened with a strange new joy in my mind. It
came to me at that moment with indescribable poignancy, the thought of walking barefoot in cool fresh plow furrows, as I had once done when a boy. So vividly the memory came to me--the high, airy world, as it was at that moment, and the boy I was, walking free in the furrows--that the weak tears filled my eyes, the first I had shed in many years.

Then I thought of sitting in quiet thickets in old fence corners, the wood behind me rising still, cool, mysterious, and the fields in front stretching away in illimitable pleasantness. I thought of the good smell of cows at milking. You do not know if you do not know! I thought of the sights and sounds, the heat and sweat of the hayfields. I thought of a certain brook I knew when a boy that flowed among alders and wild parsnips, where I waded with a three foot rod of trout. I thought of all these things as a man thinks of his first love. Oh, I craved the soil! I hungered and thirsted for the earth. I was greedy for growing things.