Friday, May 30, 2014

JUNE'S VENTURE; January 1907; A Serial Story by "Gay;" Part 4 of 4

At bedtime Mrs. Gresham directed June up to the little room which was to be hers, a dear little nest of a room, so cool and clean. In spite of all the interesting things there were to think about June was asleep at once.

In a few days June felt as if she had always lived in the country. She was quick to follow directions and the little house shone as if its own mistress were about. June loved to get up early in the morning and go down to the little stone spring house and skim the yellow cream for breakfast. She never forgot some fresh flowers for the table to lend a little fragrance to the meal. She loved to be out in the garden hoeing and weeding and on rainy days transplanting little plants. She liked to gather the vegetables and cook them for the meals. She sang as she worked and her cheeks grew round and plump. She soon made bread and butter that Mrs. Gresham said rivaled her own, and that Mr. Gresham said were nearly as good.

June found the days all very full, but she was young and strong and delighted with the work, and never seemed to feel tired. She learned plain sewing, mending and darning, and though she liked the other work better she knew this must be done. Mrs. Gresham gained rapidly, and she was soon able to walk about again. She and June sang and laughed over their work, and each learned from the other. They put up preserves and sauce, until the fruit closet was so full Mrs. Gresham said it would burst, and besides, where would the tomatoes and pickles go? During the harvest June learned to milk; of course it took time, but she kept at it in spite of lame arms and at last grew to be very proficient. When Mrs. Gresham was strong enough they went into the woods and June soon loved the cool darkness of the hemlocks. On Sabbath
mornings the white haired minister always had a message for the girl, and life began for her. As she lay under the leafy boughs Sunday afternoon, gazing up through the leaves into the sky, she began to understand and feel the Divine help and to know that heaven was very near her all the time.

As autumn came there were apples to dry, tomatoes to can and pickles to make, and a hundred things to do to get ready for winter, but June found time for long tramps into the woods, gathering large bunches of asters, goldenrod, and bright leaves to adorn the house.

"Oh, how lovely the world is, and how happy I am," she would sigh.

At last winter came and covered the ground with a deep, soft blanket of snow, but still June enjoyed the country; the snow sparkled and the air was crisp and bracing. In January she received word from her aunt that the bank where the bulk of her  money was placed had failed, and for the present she was going to make her home with her son. "I am sorry for you, Janet," she wrote, "but I see no way to help you. If you had stayed with me I might have found a way. Now, you will have to care for yourself."

June wrote assuring her aunt she was doing well, and there was no need to worry.

The winter passed and glad spring came bringing back the birds and flowers. For the present June was to stay at "The Populars," and whatever the future held for her, she was content in the happy "today."


Unknown said...

Very much enjoying this adventure with june, hoping this is not the last of the stories about her life. val jones

gail said...

I too am enjoying reading about June and what a lovely employer and friend Mrs Gresham has become. I realise that June would have really worked very hard without all the modcons we have today but her life seems so joyful and her contentment shines through.
I smiled when I saw The Farmers Wife Sampler Quilt Book for sale in a little quilt shop here on the south coast of NSW, Australia the other day
Blessings Gail.

Laurie Aaron Hird said...

The values taught in this short story are familiar to readers of The Farmer's Wife magazine--love of God and of country life; contentment in difficult circumstances, hard work and perseverance--values that this ol' world still needs today.

Thanks for your comment, "Unknown." I'll look and see if there are any more "June" stories.

The worldwide aspect of quilting has always amazed me. To think that a copy of The Farmer's Wife Sampler can be found on the south coast of Australia! I hope that the farmer's wives would be pleased to know that their wonderful letters have been read all over the world. Thanks for your comments, Gail.

Miriam said...

I, too, would love to hear more about June. I really enjoyed to read this story! Maybe you'll create something yourself? I'm sure she later had a family of her own :-)