Friday, February 18, 2011

WHO ARE THE MASTER FARM HOMEMAKERS? part 6; 1930

Mrs. O. T. Osmundson; Blue Earth, Minnesota:

Makes approximately $1,200 a year by teaching music, boarding the teacher and selling poultry products. Has kept accounts ever since her marriage. Is 4-H Club leader, helped organize community club and is home project leader.

Mrs. W. O. Plocker; Blue Earth, Minnesota:

Thinks more young people would stay on the farm if homes they live in now and had more of city's conveniences, if children had a genuine share in the live stock as they grow up, “if when boys are large enough to farm they get a share of the crop” and if all feasible means of recreation are provided.

Mrs. T. S. Soine, Iron, Minnesota:

After 13 years in town moved back to farm on account of her six children. Moved to uncleared timber farm on Minnesota Iron Range, with only three horses, one cow and 40 Leghorn hens. Two children are in high school, two in college and another is graduate of medical school. Born in Norway.

Mrs. Charles E. Wirt; Lewiston, Minnesota:

A city girl who married a young farmer (just starting out for himself and in debt) against the “better” judgment of many of the neighbors and relatives. The first year most of her efforts were failures but since then she and her husband have nearly paid off the mortgage, they have improved the farm, remodeled the house, reared four children and helped build a better community. Takes time for leisure and self-development each day.

Mrs. Frank B. Fulkerson; Higginsville, Missouri:

Reared four adopted children, two of whom have graduated from college. President of school board, teaches nature study to neighborhood children, member of county farm bureau board and active in church and community club. “I think that work in varied organizations prevents a woman from getting petty after her children are grown.”

Mrs. Alfred Jones; Maryville, Missouri:

“Each child had his own money, partly earned by himself. During high school days each checked on the family bank account and the privilege was never abused.” Has attractive lawn, garden, lily pool and rose hedge. Says community service has given her life much of value.

Mrs. J. C. Longan; Sedalia, Missouri:

“Whatever success I may have had has been largely due to a sympathetic and cooperative husband.” Has had two Father-and-Son banquets in her home. Gets three hours leisure a day “by continually weighing the importance of each task and giving it no more than it deserves.” Adds from $600 to $900 to family income through poultry flock.

Mrs. R. E. Lee Utz; St. Joseph, Missouri:

Lives on 48-acre truck and fruit farm. Plans meals week in advance. Has kept accounts 12 years.
Twice president County Federation of Farm Women's clubs and president State Federation of Homemakers in 1929.

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